J Clin Exp Dent. 2017;9(8):e952-7: Bond strength of all-ceramic systems

Journal section: Prosthetic Dentistry
Publication Types: Research

Influence of thermal and mechanical fatigue on the shear bond strength of different all-ceramic systems.

Hugo-Alberto Vidotti 1, Jefferson-Ricardo Pereira 2, Elizeu Insaurralde 3, Luiz F. Plaça 4, José R. Delben 5, Accácio-Lins do Valle 6

1 Department of Prosthodontics, University of São Paulo, Bauru, SP, Brazil
2 Department of Prosthodontics, University of Southern Santa Catarina, Tubarão, SC, Brazil
3 Department of Prosthodontics and Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of South Mato Grosso, Campo Grande, MS, Brazil
4 Department of Physics, Center of Exact Sciences and Technology, University of South Mato Grosso, Campo Grande, MS, Brazil
5 Department of Physics, Center of Exact Sciences and Technology, University of South Mato Grosso, Campo Grande, MS, Brazil
6 Department of Prosthodontics, University of São Paulo, Bauru, SP, Brazil

Correspondence:

University of Southern Santa Catarina, Tubarão, SC, Brazil
Address: Rua Recife 200 – Apto 601 –
Bairro Recife – CEP: 88701-420
jeffripe@rocketmail.com

Abstract

Background: To evaluate the influence of thermal and mechanical fatigue on the shear bond strength of different all-ceramic cores and veneering porcelain interfaces.
Material and Methods: All-ceramic systems tested were lithium disilicate and zirconia veneered by layering tech-nique. Sixty specimens (n=20) were subjected to shear bond strength. Ten of them were thermal and mechanicalcycled. Fracture analysis was performed with stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Energy disper-sive X-ray spectroscopy analysis was performed across core/veneer interfaces.

Results: Thermal and mechanical cycling did not influence on bond strength. However, there was significant difference among systems (<0.01). CoCr group presented the highest values, followed by lithium disilicate, and zirconia. Failure modes were predominantly adhesive for CoCr, cohesive in core for lithium disilicate, and cohesive inveneer for zirconia. Energy dispersive X-ray showed interaction zone for CoCr and lithium disilicate groups and was inconclusive for zirconia. Fatigue had no influence on bond strength of groups tested. Conclusions: The results suggest that there is a chemical bond between core and veneer materials for CoCr and lithium disilicate groups.

Key words: Ceramics, electron microscopy, fatigue, mechanical stress, shear bond strength.

1Comentário
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    Posted at 15:35h, 06 dezembro Responder

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